Semester: Wintersemester 2014/2015

3.02.151 S New Nature Writing


Veranstaltungstermin

  • Freitag: 08:00 - 10:00, wöchentlich

Beschreibung

Ecocriticism, which studies the relationship between literature and the human and non-human environment, has noticed an increase in “new” concerns and ways of representing non-human nature in literature. The buzzword connected to this new trend is the Anthropocene, a term popularized by scientist Paul Crutzen, meaning a new epoch in which humanity has become a central geological and climatological factor. In this course, we will investigate these new concerns of the Anthropocene and its representations with the help of texts (fiction, non-fiction and film) from England, America, and Australia. Apart from questions concerning how cultural and literary representations influence the way we think about, treat, and value the environment, our reading will also broach “place” as a key cultural concept when discussing issues of postcolonialism, race, gender, and class.

Course requirements: Regular attendance, active participation in class discussions, preparation of the weekly readings. Please purchase and read/watch:

Alexis Wright. Carpentaria (2006).

Robert Macfarlane. The Wild Places (2007).

Robert Kenner. Food, Inc. (2008).

DozentIn

Studienmodule

  • ang615 Motifs - Themes - Issues (and their Media)
  • PB 195a Erweiterte anglophone Sprach- und Kulturkompetenz
  • PB 195b Erweiterte anglophone Sprach- und Kulturkompetenz
  • pb113 Erweiterte anglophone Sprach- und Kulturkompetenz
  • pb114 Erweiterte anglophone Sprach- und Kulturkompetenz

Studienbereiche

  • Studium generale / Gasthörstudium

Für Gasthörende / Studium generale geöffnet:
Ja

Hinweise zum Inhalt der Veranstaltung für Gasthörende
Ecocriticism, which studies the relationship between literature and the human and non-human environment, has noticed an increase in “new” concerns and ways of representing non-human nature in literature. The buzzword connected to this new trend is the Anthropocene, a term popularized by scientist Paul Crutzen, meaning a new epoch in which humanity has become a central geological and climatological factor. In this course, we will investigate these new concerns of the Anthropocene and its representations with the help of texts (fiction, non-fiction and film) from England, America, and Australia. Apart from questions concerning how cultural and literary representations influence the way we think about, treat, and value the environment, our reading will also broach “place” as a key cultural concept when discussing issues of postcolonialism, race, gender, and class. Course requirements: Regular attendance, active participation in class discussions, preparation of the weekly readings. Please purchase and read/watch: Alexis Wright. Carpentaria (2006). Robert Macfarlane. The Wild Places (2007). Robert Kenner. Food, Inc. (2008).

Lehrsprache
englisch

empfohlenes Fachsemester
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