Kognitive Psychologie

Practical Project

(MSc in Neurocognitive Psychology)

A. Hellmann

Head movements in auditory sound localization

Human listeners use binaural cues to localize the azimuth of a sound source, i.e. binaural differences in sound pressure level, temporal differences and spectral differences. Head movements alter such differences, and most experiments on auditory localization have been done with the subject's head fixed in order to control this confounding variable (cp. Moore 2008).

The question is whether humans do actively use head movements in order to produce or increase binaural differences when trying to localize a sound source, and if so, whether such head movements and localization performance are related.

In an experiment the subject would be asked to localize sound sources presented from different locations (directions). The subject's head movements are registered using a motion capture system (www.lukotronic.com).

Moore, B. C. J. (2008): An introduction to the psychology of hearing.