Collaborative Research Center / Transregio 31: The active auditory system

Summer Term 2010

Time: Friday 14 -16

Locations: room W2 1-143 (Oldenburg), room G26.1-010 (Magdeburg)

Date
Location
Title of the Talk
Speaker
invited by
16 April 2010
Oldenburg
"The synaptic representation VERSCHOBEN AUF 11.06.oving sound sources in auditory cortex"

Paul Chadderton

UCL Ear Institute London

G. KIump
23 April 2010
Oldenburg


Laminar and Temporal Distribution of Stimulus Information in Field Potentials Points to an "Event Based" Operation of Auditory Cortex


D. Phil.
Jan Schnupp

University of Oxford
Dept. of Physiology, Anatomy
and Genetics

G. Klump
7 May 2010
Magdeburg
"Interactions between tones - adaptation, masking and beyond"

PD Dr. Bernhard Gaese

Institut für Zellbiologie und Neurowissenschaft Frankfurt

AK Neurobiologie und Biosensorik

A. Brechmann
21 May 2010
Oldenburg

The Essex Hearing Dummy Project

Prof. Ray Meddis

University of Essex, Colchester

Department of Psychology

Tim Jürgens
28 May 2010
Oldenburg

Bottom-up attentional effects of sound on visual perception

Adelbert Bronkhorst

Universität Amsterdam, NL

Cognitive Psychologie

B. Kollmeier
4 June 2010
Oldenburg


Plasticity of the human auditory cortex related to musical training as revealed by MEG
(Abstract)

Prof. Dr. Christo Pantev

Universität Münster

Institut für Biomagnetismus und Biosignalanalyse

B. Kollmeier
11 June 2010
Oldenburg

"The Synaptic Representation ofStatic and Moving Sound Sources in Auditory Cortex"


Paul Chadderton

UCL Ear Institute London

G. Klump
25 June 2010
Magdeburg

"Investigating the neural basis of human audio-visual object perception"

Marcus J. Naumer

Institut für Medizinische Psychologie

Goethe Universität Frankfurt
T. Nösselt
2 July 2010
Oldenburg
"The effect of reverberation on the neural representation of the pitch of complex sounds" Ian Winter

Department of Physiology, Development and Neuroscience

University of Cambridge, UK

J. Verhey
9 July 2010
Oldenburg
Rewriting the textbooks: Recent breakthroughs in our understanding of human pitch

Chris Plack

University of Manchester, UK

School of Psychological Sciences

G. Klump